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Nature_and_Environment.95

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Water

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{Nature_and_Environment.95.1}: ... {wren1111} Fri, 13 Jul 2007 23:01:08 EDT (HTML)

This topic is to discuss water issues around the globe.

Not a drop to drink "http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/2007/853/eg9.htm"

It has become a daily concern in many parts of Egypt, including the middle and upper class neighbourhoods of the capital. Nor does the problem exclude Heliopolis, the residential neighbourhood of no other than the president. "You wake up in the morning and you don't know whether you will be able to wash your face and go to the bathroom, or have to call up [a close relative or friend] who lives outside Heliopolis and Nasr City to see if you can pass by to shower and use the toilet," said Thurayah, a Heliopolis resident.

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{Nature_and_Environment.95.2}: Red {redleader} Fri, 01 Feb 2008 20:52:49 EST (7 lines)

Here's an article about a very practical way to save water and replenish
aquifers. However, it is bound to not sit well with some people.

http://www.slate.com/id/2182758/nav/tap3/?GT1=10755

I like the picture of the dog haning the man a glass of water from the
toilet bowl.

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{Nature_and_Environment.95.3}: Suzanne Griffith {sggriffith} Fri, 01 Feb 2008 22:22:52 EST (1 line)

I want a composting toilet, but they're not legal in the city.

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{Nature_and_Environment.95.4}: Red {redleader} Fri, 01 Feb 2008 23:25:40 EST (2 lines)

Even with composting toilets sewage is not going away. At least now it
can be recycled.

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{Nature_and_Environment.95.5}: uranium bioremediation {bshmr} Tue, 24 Feb 2009 10:31:04 EST (25 lines)

This seems overly simple optimism to me. On one hand or the other, I
may be missing something while certain that 'they' are.

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2009-02/csso-ppo022309.php

Patience pays off with methanol for uranium bioremediation

[quote]Researchers take advantage of microbial communities to clean
up uranium-contaminated ground water and sediment MADISON, WI,
FEBRUARY 23, 2009 – The legacy of nuclear weapons and nuclear energy
development has left ground water and sediment at dozens of sites
across the United States and many more around the world contaminated
with uranium. The uranium is transported through ground water as
uranyl (U6+). In one bioremediation strategy, uranium immobilization
in contaminated ground water and sediment may be achieved ...

...

The full article is available for no charge for 30 days following the
date of this summary. View the abstract at
http://jeq.scijournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/38/1/53. The Journal
of Environmental Quality, http://jeq.scijournals.org is a
peer-reviewed, international journal of environmental quality in
natural and agricultural ecosystems published six times a year by the
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), ... [/quote]

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{Nature_and_Environment.95.6}: {bshmr} Fri, 27 Feb 2009 18:23:14 EST (25 lines)

IMO, one of the better pieces on two related technologies for
alternative sources of electricity.

http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20126972.000-salt-solution-cheap-power-from-the-rivers-mouth.html?DCMP=OTC-rss&nsref=online-news

Salt solution: Cheap power from the river's mouth 25 February 2009 by
Kate Ravilious; Magazine issue 2697. Subscribe and get 4 free issues.
For similar stories, visit the Energy and Fuels Topic Guide

[quote]STAND on the banks of the Rhine where it flows into the North
Sea, near the port of Rotterdam in the Netherlands, and you'll witness
a vast, untapped source of energy swirling in the estuary. According
to Dutch engineer Joost Veerman, it's possible to tap this energy
without damaging the environment or disrupting the river's busy
shipping. For rather than constructing a huge barrage or dotting the
river bed with turbines, Veerman and his colleagues at Wetsus, the
Dutch Centre for Sustainable Water Technology in Leeuwarden, believe
they can tap energy locked up in the North Sea's saltwater by
channelling it, along with fresh water from the Rhine, into a novel
kind of battery. With a large enough array of these batteries, he
says, the estuary could easily provide over a gigawatt of electricity
by a process they've called Blue Energy - enough to supply about
650,000 homes.

...[/quote]

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