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Photography.6

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Ethics

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{Photography.6.81}: {tj2} Sun, 22 Aug 2004 16:28:21 CDT (0 lines)
{erased by tj2 Tue, 31 Mar 2009 14:15:03 CDT}

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{Photography.6.82}: Ed Hawco {ed1} Sun, 22 Aug 2004 23:58:12 CDT (1 line)

(Shaking my head ...)

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{Photography.6.83}: David Burke {tualatin} Mon, 23 Aug 2004 00:48:16 CDT (1 line)

Sorry experience, Jonathan.

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{Photography.6.84}: Kitty {kitty} Mon, 23 Aug 2004 06:05:24 CDT (HTML)

That's horrible.

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{Photography.6.85}: Helge Hafstad {hhaf} Mon, 23 Aug 2004 06:32:47 CDT (7 lines)

I too take pictures at playgrounds - of my oldest son now, but soon
the youngest will be old enought to play there too. I have not even
considered that sort of reaction to picture taking!

Then, be glad you had an electronic camera where you could show the
pictures immediately. Think of the extra hazzle you would have had if
film based...

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{Photography.6.86}: Cleophus {cleophus} Mon, 23 Aug 2004 23:20:11 CDT (1 line)

Ugh.  That's pretty crappy Jonathan.

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{Photography.6.87}: Coyote {coyote} Mon, 23 Aug 2004 23:50:53 CDT (1 line)

That just totally sucks the big one. Buncha medieval dickweeds.

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{Photography.6.88}: {jonathan68} Tue, 24 Aug 2004 04:46:30 CDT (0 lines)
{erased by jonathan68 Tue, 24 Aug 2004 05:47:19 CDT}

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{Photography.6.89}: Jonathan {jonathan68} Tue, 24 Aug 2004 05:54:57 CDT (20 lines)

Another time I shall be more careful - though I fear that's easier
said than done when you don't see a problem coming.

Issues incude: territorial young toughs; a man on his own (they
thought) in a place where (they considered) he had no place to
be; and the panic whipped up by Britain's tabloid press over child
abuse and stranger danger (which neglects the rotten truth that
kids are far more likely to suffer harm in their own homes).

I wonder if there isn't also something about a camera that we
forget at our peril. You hear about primitive tribes who fear a
photograph will steal their soul. A camera might be an everyday
object, but perhaps that kind of thinking is more engrained than
we realise?

What pains me is the police reaction. That they had to
investigate I don't question. But the way a senior police officer
failed to challenge a blatant incident of threatening behaviour still
shocks me. Vigilantes should not be allowed to get away with
laying down the law, but that's just what happened.

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{Photography.6.90}: David Burke {tualatin} Tue, 24 Aug 2004 09:50:14 CDT (2 lines)

What about putting your journalistic skills towards a newspaper
article or letter to the editor? Could have a positive impact.

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{Photography.6.91}: Coyote {coyote} Tue, 24 Aug 2004 11:05:18 CDT (1 line)

Ooo... *excellent* idea!

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{Photography.6.92}: {jonathan68} Wed, 25 Aug 2004 04:42:43 CDT (0 lines)
{erased by jonathan68 Wed, 25 Aug 2004 05:45:58 CDT}

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{Photography.6.93}: Jonathan {jonathan68} Wed, 25 Aug 2004 06:03:36 CDT (11 lines)

Thanks.

I'm in two minds but I may do that. It certainly  feels like
unfinished business though I'm not sure how far I want to stick
my head above the parapet.

When writing professionally I seldom use the first person
singular - partly because that's never been my sort of journalism,
but also because when you're at the centre of the story it does
risk making you a target, and I've had quite enough of feeling
targeted.

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{Photography.6.94}: David {david} Wed, 25 Aug 2004 06:42:27 CDT (1 line)

That's perfectly understandable.

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{Photography.6.95}: {tj2} Sun, 17 Oct 2004 11:45:59 CDT (0 lines)
{erased by tj2 Tue, 31 Mar 2009 14:15:27 CDT}

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{Photography.6.96}: Anne {greylocks} Mon, 18 Oct 2004 09:28:42 CDT (21 lines)

Most interesting discussion.  I like my photos to look like what I
saw and this frequently means tweaking them. My eye sees a subject,
but the camera captures too much distracting background so I crop it.
I see bright orange leaves against a vivid blue sky, but I didn't
adjust the white balance and the image is washed out so I adjust the
brightness and contrast until it looks like what I saw.  I get a great
shot only to discover my thumb in the corner so I PhotoShop it out
leaving the picture I thought I was taking.

I just got PhotoShop Elements and am at the baby end of the learning
curve. I've played around a bit with filters and artistic effects, but
for me the biggest thrill of photography is the stalking part.
Something catches my eye so I move in closer and try this angle and
that angle and then when I think I have it just right "snap" goes the
shutter.

As far as the news photography issue, I agree that media has the
right to chose and edit their photos. Many newspapers  have guidelines
against using images that are too graphic. I'm OK with that. However,
I thought censoring photos of flag draped coffins was just as
unethical as adding a severed arm (or head) where there was none.

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{Photography.6.97}: Jenny Reiswig {jreiswig} Mon, 18 Oct 2004 14:27:38 CDT (10 lines)

I believe that wrt to news photography, editing pictures is OK but I
think they should have to TELL us they were edited so we don't take
them on face value.  Yes, there's always some level of editing
involved in just composing the shot - moving the camera so an
inconvenient bit is out of the frame.  But when the content of the
picture is different from what the scene actually showed, I think that
matters in serious journalism.  There should be a disclaimer similar
to the one they use on TV when showing a movie that's been edited from
the original.  "This photo was slightly altered for reasons of graphic
content."

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{Photography.6.98}: Curt McNamara {curtmc} Mon, 18 Oct 2004 21:53:18 CDT (14 lines)

So one perspective is that photography is art, not some absolute act
of representation? I can see this. On the other hand, I tend to think
of a picture as real, and if it is beautiful I want to go there.

A possibly related thought -- I used to read the Sun magazine and was
very moved by many of their stories. Eventually I figured out they
were not all true (shockingly naive, that Curt) and was disturbed that
I had been moved to feel what I did since it was not clear they were
fiction or non-fiction. A friend (who is an avid fiction reader) said
she feels fiction is often more real than non-fiction, since the
author is not required to stick to the facts but can go where their
consciousness demands.

                                      Curt

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{Photography.6.99}: David {david} Tue, 19 Oct 2004 11:59:00 CDT (7 lines)

The quote for this Forum is "You don't take a photograph, you make
it"

I only take pictures to please myself, so I have no compunctions
about altering anything I feel like altering.  Truth is, reality is
sometimes boring, and I want my shots to be more interesting than
that.  If only for myself.

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{Photography.6.100}: {tj2} Tue, 19 Oct 2004 18:25:25 CDT (0 lines)
{erased by tj2 Tue, 31 Mar 2009 14:16:00 CDT}

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{Photography.6.101}: Paddrick Mackin {paddrick} Tue, 19 Oct 2004 20:30:48 CDT (11 lines)

Right on T.J.,

Further, even when looking at the same image or photo, whether art or
documentary, we don't see things as they are but as we are
conditioned to be.  There is no real, only perception, even when we
view the identical thing, photo or image.  We can't know an image
until we first know ourselves.  Most often, our comments and
observations are autobiographical.  As a student of Covey, I'm
reminded that we should seek to understand before being understood.

Ooops; I got excited!  Tell me more about how you see it.

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{Photography.6.102}: Curt McNamara {curtmc} Tue, 19 Oct 2004 22:06:45 CDT (20 lines)

I can certainly understand what you guys are saying, appreciate
photography as art, and am not being critical of extending the act of
photography into the computer. After all, when this stuff was done in
the darkroom there was another set of corrections and changes people
did! The comments are more about me (surprise, surprise) than about
you'all (sp) :-)

I first got disoriented by this issue when looking at the book
Migrations and being amazed at the quantity of animals in some shots.
Then when I read the credits he said he had digitally manipulated some
images to add some impact. I didn't like that, I kind of expect that
if I see something in nature (a certain color of a mushroom for
example) that I could go into the woods and find something close to it.

Interestingly enough the best bird books (another love of mine) are
not the photographic ones, but the ones where an artist has extracted
the features and given an image of a representative bird (Sibley for
example).

                                      Curt

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{Photography.6.103}: Jenny Reiswig {jreiswig} Tue, 19 Oct 2004 22:56:53 CDT (19 lines)

Photography has been meddled with for the sake of art since its very
early days.  Double exposure, fiddling with the film, tinting,
airbrushing out undesirable things.  One of our few antique
possessions is a large family portrait in a fancy curved-glass frame
of my grandma's big Swedish family when she was about 13.  Her family
is standing outside, boys lined up on one side of the proud parents,
girls on the other.  The girls are all in dark stockings and the
artist who painted in the green grass, pink cheeks and blue sky
miscounted and painted out my grandma's legs so she's floating in the
air.

Artists often go to elaborate lengths to stage a photo - lighting just
so, preparing the subject, etc.  Why is manipulation after the shutter
clicks worse than manipulation before?  I know what you mean -
sometimes when you find out after viewing a picture that it was
altered you can feel cheated.  Especially when you admired the
virtuosity of the photographer's work.  I guess it's still the
photgrapher's work, but somehow knowing that it wasn't that one
perfect instant, it's not the same.  I'm rambling and need to stop now!

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{Photography.6.104}: Paddrick Mackin {paddrick} Wed, 20 Oct 2004 00:30:45 CDT (13 lines)

Speaking of "Migration," I would like to recommend the DVD, "Winged
Migration" to every lover of nature.  I've seen it twice and it gives
wing to my soul.
. . . .
I caught this morning morning's minion, kingdom of daylight's
dauphin, dapple-dawn-drawn Falcon, in his riding of the rolling level
underneath him steady air, and striding high there, how he rung upon
the rein of a wimpling wing in his ecstasy! then off, off forth on
swing, ss a skate's heel sweeps smooth on a bow-bend: the hurl and
gliding rebuffed the big wind. My heart in hiding stirred for a
bird, -- the achieve of, the mastery of the thing!

G.M. Hopkins!

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{Photography.6.105}: Anne {greylocks} Wed, 20 Oct 2004 16:21:07 CDT (3 lines)

I saw Winged Migration on the big screen and watched the whole thing
with my mouth hanging open in amazement. Totally awesome. I bet the
DVD has some good extras on how it was made.

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