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Nature_and_Environment.15

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Eco-Social Culture

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.1}: James River Martin {rivertree} Fri, 26 Mar 2004 12:49:58 CST (18 lines)

Eco-social? Yeah, ecologically and socially appropriate, healthy,
informed .... Its more than just how we vote at the voting booth, its
how we build our houses, how we heat them, where our food comes from,
what sort of economies we work to create and sustain .... Its how we
educate our children, too. And how we think about all of the basic
things in life, whether transportation, politics, philosophy-
religion, ... all of life.

I could go on forever describing what I mean by "ecosocial"
and "ecosocial culture". But it would be better to unfold the notions
in dialogue.

What I really want to discuss is the HOW and the CAN WE DO IT?

HOW can we accomplish the transformation in culture which is required
of us?

CAN WE DO IT?

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.2}: Richard Witty {gisland2} Fri, 26 Mar 2004 13:46:55 CST (5 lines)

Yes, we can.

Not by force though, nor by preconceived conclusions, more by
imagination and effort applying principles of waste <-> food and
social utilization of capital items.

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.3}: Karen Iwamoto {kai28} Sun, 28 Mar 2004 15:37:23 CST (26 lines)

I think we can do it- mostly through gentle peer pressure.
Unfortunately, I think it'll be a gradual change, and while that
change is occurring and evolving, we'll all suffer a bit. But it will
come.

As my husband and I learn new things, and try to impliment more
eco-social changes/ideals into our daily lives, our friends have
noticed, and are slowly changing their ideals and methods of doing
things. Which is amazing, because as a demographic, our friends are
statistically the least likely people in America to make these
changes. As my husband is in the military, most of our friends are
also in the military. Miltary personel are stereotypically known for
their conservativeness and resistance to social change. But now we've
gotten them thinking about fuel efficiency in their vehicles,
alternative energy sources, the ethics of where you choose to spend
your money, and the benefits of organic, all natural foods. Most of
this has been done by setting an example, and gently explaining to
anyone who will listen why we do the things we do, and how our choices
will benefit us all in the short and long term.

I know that small changes like this wont change the world. But as more
and more people create more and more converts, eventually the
marketplace will have to cater to those new, more widely held ideals.

thats my idealistic theory anyway. I'm hoping not to die a bitter and
dissapointed old woman someday.

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.4}: eco-feminism {wren1111} Mon, 07 Jun 2004 15:10:47 CDT (3 lines)

Feminism is solution for humanity's plights  ( ??)
http://www.dailyemerald.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2004/06/03/40bf555ce1
f86

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.5}: Tom Elliot {telliot} Mon, 07 Jun 2004 18:33:15 CDT (HTML)

"http://www.dailyemerald.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2004/06/03/40bf555ce1f86"

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.6}: Leading, or not. {bshmr} Mon, 21 Jun 2004 11:11:44 CDT (26 lines)

[ Peek? Hippy-esque, arty, personal, ... . Spam extract. Contrast to
RR in style and tone. ]

Millennium Twain

green growing mindedness ...

walking 'out' of our televisions and automobiles ...

http://fireships.com
http://LivingLightHouse.Com
http://unamity.com/SoverAnia.jpg
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Aemortal/
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TheMessiah/
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/GoldenMillennium/
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LeagueOfTheLastDays/

in http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/BigMedicine/ we are
coordinating volunteers who are stepping forward to chronicle the
Last Ceremonies and Last Statements of all the worlds
native/tribal/aboriginal peoples.  please join us if you have native
connections!
........
now in our 508th day of global fasting for world peace ...

http://lists.riseup.net/www/info/worldfast

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.7}: Helge Hafstad {hhaf} Tue, 22 Jun 2004 02:19:58 CDT (1 line)

Looks very much like uncultured spam to me...

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.8}: Lucas Pitts {lpitts} Wed, 23 Jun 2004 19:01:16 CDT (16 lines)

I have to say that everybody at first seems to be very "into" making
small changes with their lifestyle.  We are personally constantly
adjusting our lifestyles so we leave a smaller and smaller
footprint.  Our families and friends watch us do these things and
listen to us talk about them and they get very enthused.
Unfortunately when it comes to long term application with most of
these people they just seem to lose interest for some reason.  I
don't know if it's shear laziness, or just old habits die hard, it
just seems impossible to get them to change their patterns even
though mentally they agree with everything we do.  It's quite
strange really.

That being said, I think our best bet to really fundamentally change
the planet is after the baby boomers have passed.  Maybe I'm being
idealistic but I just know so many more kids that are involved now
then there ever were when I was in highschool or university.

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.9}: Suzanne Griffith {sggriffith} Wed, 23 Jun 2004 20:03:49 CDT (4 lines)

>>Our families and friends watch us do these things and
listen to us talk about them and they get very enthused.<<

Not my family and friends! You're lucky.

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.10}: Anita Keese {anodekraft} Tue, 31 Aug 2004 21:01:58 CDT (15 lines)

When I try and tell people how I live, I generally get weird looks,
even from my family and friends who call themselves
environmentalists.  I use old towels instead of paper towels (and
I've found alternatives for other paper products too).  We compost.
I don't kill spiders around my house.  We use old jars instead of
tupperware.  Got rid of the carpet instead of replacing it and
painted our walls with no-VOC milk paint.  I use baking soda and
vingar and (rarely) orange oil as my only household cleaners.  We go
grocery shopping once a month and so we end up buying very few
convience items.

None of these things took much adjustment, but the perception is
these things are gross or extreme or way "out there". I don't
understand why these simple things are viewed with such suspicion!
It isn't that hard (and much cheaper!)

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.11}: James River Martin {rivertree} Wed, 08 Sep 2004 13:32:09 CDT (3 lines)

Question:

What are the most eco-culturally "friendly" towns/cities in America?

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.12}: August West {augustwest} Thu, 18 Nov 2004 03:07:17 CST (36 lines)

I recently asked Dr. David Suzuki for his thoughts on the futility
of sustainability when taken in the context of a mushrooming global
human population, particularly when the four fastest growing
populations (ie. China, India, Brazil and Indonesia) have less than
enviable environmental records. His response centred on the
expectation of a massive human “die-off” due to a viral mutation
from non-human hosts to human ones. Not exactly an encouraging
answer, but the most realistic one I could hope to find anywhere.

So, if a human catastrophe is the only thing that will save the
planet from ourselves, why do we bother with any environmental
initiatives? Why don’t we just accept that we, as humans, are
unsustainable? As this is obviously the case, why do we make small
personal efforts to reduce, reuse and recycle; to take the bus; to
eat vegetarian? Since, we share the same fate as the dinosaurs, what
drives this mentality? Selfishness or selflessness?

With this backdrop, the only difference I can hope to make by living
more sensibly is a difference in myself. I pat myself on the back
for buying local products and using my organic cotton shopping bag.
I seethe with self-righteous indignation at those who throw their
beer cans in the garbage and use drive-thru fast-food multi-
nationals. I preach the benefits of less packaging and brand-less
products. But who or what does this really benefit? My conscience. I
sleep better at night knowing that, at least, I’m not part of the
problem. What denial! My mere existence as a human on this planet IS
the problem.

But, the planet’s aboriginal humans lived in harmony with their
natural surroundings for millennia. So what happened? The bite of an
apple, maybe? Currency based economies? Who knows? Whatever the
case, somewhere along the course of human history, we became
unsustainable. It isn’t IF we have an impact, but HOW MUCH of an
impact we have. The best we can do is to minimize this impact, and
buy the planet some time to kill the cancer, before the cancer kills
the planet.

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.13}: Suzanne Griffith {sggriffith} Thu, 18 Nov 2004 12:08:18 CST (2 lines)

I applaud your efforts. Fast food isn't that great, anyway, and trees
are prettier than parking lots.

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.14}: Anita Keese {anodekraft} Thu, 18 Nov 2004 14:30:16 CST (19 lines)

This is a fairly misleading intro....but reflects a real proposed
study...scary

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced plans to
launch an outrageous new study in which participating low income
families will have their children exposed to toxic pesticides over
the course of two years. For taking part in these studies, each
family will receive $970, a free video camera, a T-shirt, and a
framed certificate of appreciation. The study entitled CHEERS
(Children's Environmental Exposure Research Study) will look at how
chemicals can be ingested, inhaled or absorbed by children ranging
from babies to 3 years old.

Please take a moment to follow this link and join tens of thousands
of citizens in petitioning the EPA to terminate this study prior to
its proposed launch in early 2005.


http://www.epa.gov/cheers/basic.htm#do

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.15}: ... {wren1111} Tue, 30 Nov 2004 18:33:17 CST (7 lines)

They are not asking families to add pesticides to their homes. They
are asking for families to continue having the same cleaners,
pesticides, etc that they always have to act as control groups.

In other words, most American families would be eligible to
participate as "controls" because most have lots of toxic chemicals
already in use in their homes.

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.16}: Anita Keese {anodekraft} Wed, 01 Dec 2004 12:29:43 CST (1 line)

And you find this comforting?

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.17}: Sebastian Lye {badchin} Wed, 01 Dec 2004 12:36:33 CST (24 lines)

I would like to respond to August West's q. about selfishness and
selflessness in regaurds to sustainability and wheather or not humans
can accept that our fate is the same as the dinosaurs.  Are we
smarter than dinosaurs? I hope so.  Lately I have been pondering the
state of the human race and our potential, it seems as though since
the industrial revolution humans have thrown sustainability to the
wind.  My question is whether or not we can call this 'Progress' as
technical and industrial invention is often called. Native Americans
lived in a symbiotic and sustainable relationship with the Earth.  I
have come to believe that it is not that humans are inherantly flawed
but our sense of compitition and what we call 'Progress'.  Money-
makes-the-world-burn-down.  Innovation is tricky business, it can
hurt or help, but we tend not to discern which is which.  There is no
question that humans must move forward into the future and the will
to survive will always predominate but lately it has been my feeling
that we may have to move 'backwards' deciding what is worth keeping
and what should be forgotten.  Some of the postings above talk about
lifestyle and using jars instead of tupperware but what is that other
than an older style when it comes to the management of resources.
Sure plastics should be the firs to go, I would like to see
alternatives soon.  Imagine a brand new Mac G5 incased in a nice
cherry wood. If we do eventually begin a reversion to old ways the
real trick will be keeping the tools we need while getting rid of the
materials we dont.

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.18}: {redleader} Wed, 01 Dec 2004 22:14:09 CST (29 lines)
{name removed by chiles Mon, 21 Jan 2008 11:52:51 CST}

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced plans to
launch an outrageous new study in which participating low income
families will have their children exposed to toxic pesticides over
the course of two years. For taking part in these studies, each
family will receive $970, a free video camera, a T-shirt, and a
framed certificate of appreciation. The study entitled CHEERS
(Children's Environmental Exposure Research Study) will look at how
chemicals can be ingested, inhaled or absorbed by children ranging
from babies to 3 years old.

Please take a moment to follow this link and join tens of thousands
of citizens in petitioning the EPA to terminate this study prior to
its proposed launch in early 2005.>>>>>>

  I see nothing wrong with this study at all. As Wren pointed out the
family is not asked to do anything that they weren't alreay doing.
The kids aren't being exposed to anything that wasn't already in the
house.

   All that is being done is that information is being taken on
children in the household routines that they are already using. The
parents inventory what they use, the child's routine is detailed,
some sensors are placed for a while on the child, and some samples
are taken. What they are doing is pretty ethical and noninvasive.

   In fact it might be beneficial. If the parents get the data and
don't like what is showing up in their child's system, they might
change what they use in their house. And whatever is done, vital
information will be collected.

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.19}: Wren W {wren1111} Fri, 03 Dec 2004 20:35:32 CST (6 lines)

{16}

Well, sure, who wouldn't? I mean, I think we should encourage poor
parents to bathe their kids in Lysol so we can see what happens to
them ... that's what I really meant (but you sort of have to read
between the lines of my earlier post to discern that).

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.20}: Anita Keese {anodekraft} Mon, 06 Dec 2004 07:59:41 CST (10 lines)

Just the idea of testing..."after the fact".

People seem to trust that anything you can buy has been rigorously
tested for safety.  Well, only enough to avoid litigation long enough
so a huge profit can be made.

I've heard salesmen at nurseries I've gone to say that certain
pestidides are "safe enough to drink".

This mentality is pervasive.

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.21}: Lihidheb Mohsen {boughmiga} Thu, 09 Dec 2004 13:10:34 CST (7 lines)

I realized  an eco-action during 12 years wich gave cultural,
artistic, ethical, mystic...and principaly ecologic lectures. It is a
one men participation to a new approach toward nature and beings.

www.eng.fsu.edu/~abichou/ocean/art/art1.htm
or through google after taping lihidheb mohsen and click on sea
memories collection

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.22}: NYC Hawks (2 kinds *g*) {bshmr} Thu, 09 Dec 2004 15:20:24 CST (10 lines)

[ Above all, there was a failure to communicate. ]

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/12/09/opinion/09thu3.html?th
EDITORIAL
Squatting Rights
Published: December 9, 2004
...
The hawks have gone out of their way to learn to live with us. The
least the wealthy residents of 927 Fifth Avenue could have done was
learn to live with the hawks.

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.23}: Harold Williams {willy19} Fri, 10 Dec 2004 20:03:52 CST (2 lines)

Do you think all the pollution released into the atmosphere is
causing the winter time to expire?

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.24}: {bshmr} Fri, 10 Dec 2004 21:09:36 CST (3 lines)

Cities are heat sinks. Recent reports documented that metropolitan
areas are modifying their local weather -- less rainfall, less cold,
more heat, etc..

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{Nature_and_Environment.15.25}: ... {wren1111} Mon, 13 Dec 2004 20:29:07 CST (HTML)

Canada Allowing Widespread Use of Emergency Drug (Slice) in Farmed Salmon

"http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/December2004/09/c3353.htm "l

VICTORIA, BC, Dec. 9 /CNW/ - A new report released today by the Raincoast Conservation Society shows that Health Canada approves the widespread use of a highly toxic emergency drug called Slice to control sea lice in Canadian farmed salmon. Residues of the drug have shown up in farmed salmon going to market; Canada exports the vast majority of its farmed salmon, and the U.S. consumes 95% of those exports

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